The Current Techniques of Nigerian Scammers
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The Current Techniques of Nigerian Scammers

By now, almost everyone has heard of the Nigerian scam tactics that are out there. But, just when you think you have seen them all, another one pops up over the horizon. All current techniques of Nigerian scammers are spin offs of the original Nigerian scam, which has been around for several years and has deceived many people.

By now, almost everyone has heard of the Nigerian scam tactics that are out there. But, just when you think you have seen them all, another one pops up over the horizon. All current techniques of Nigerian scammers are spin offs of the original Nigerian scam, which has been around for several years and has deceived many people. The original seemed like a lucrative and official arrangement. Forged documents with Nigerian government seals and letterhead were used. Payment schedules were set up and meetings were arranged with government officials. When a victim finally thought it was a done deal, something would always go wrong. The victim would then be asked for more and more money to save the venture. There were always bribes and fees to be paid before the large sums of money would arrive. This scheme could take months to unfold, and for some it turned out to be a dangerous game. Because the scam became so famous, many are now wise to it. However, that has not stopped some crooks from coming up with the following versions.

One of the latest themes for Nigerian scammers is when a new renter is tricked into thinking that they are working with an absent legitimate apartment owner. The apartment owner is not actually an owner but pretends to be. The new renter is told that they do not have to send an advanced payment. Instead, the renter is informed that they need proof of the ability to pay rent. It is suggested that an electronic payment of a few thousand dollars be sent to a relative or friend where the money will be in safe keeping. The fake apartment owner then asks for a copy of the transfer of payment to the relative or friend, just to prove that a payment was actually made. After receiving the copy, the crook then poses as the friend or relative and takes the copy and collects the money at a Western Union office. The lesson learned is to never send electronic payments or a copy of a payment to a stranger.

Many people who have been selling items on eBay and other sites, have become wise to scam artists such as Nigerian scammers who use forged checks or stolen credit cards to pay for items. Because of this, many sellers are insisting on the use of PayPal to receive payments. Buyers from overseas, especially Africa, have been the ones who have caused the most problems. Recently, vendors have been receiving an email from PayPal stating that money has been credited to their account for the item needing to be shipped. If a seller gets busy and does not check their actual PayPal account, then they may be out the money for the item if they ship it. This message might be a fake. It is easy for a thief to obtain an email address and to design a PayPal look alike message. Open a new browser and check the account to make sure the money is really there. Never click a link in any of these messages.

Another clever scam is when someone actually receives a check for a large sum of money. Often times, the check will come from the Central Bank of Nigeria. Enclosed with the check is a message to keep 10% of the money and send the rest to the person who sent it. If someone does not send it back, then a follow up email will come from the FBI stating that they have been investigating the situation and it is genuine and legal. If action still is not taken, another message will arrive from the United Nations saying the Nigerian government wants to improve a tarnished image and really does want to make compensation in order to have a good name. Of course, these crooks are looking for bank information. What they say is true, you will not get money for nothing. Never give out bank account information or wire cash to someone you have never heard of, even if they say they are a president of a country.

Another new Nigerian scammer variation is the US Army scam. The email starts out by saying, "I am (name), a sergeant in the American army, presently in Iraq." It goes on to say that they have smuggled out millions through a diplomatic channel. Of course, the funds are secure in a finance company in Europe and they will need the help of the person reading the email to help them move it to a safe bank account. Do not fall for it, just because it is from someone supposedly in the US Army or from a trusted country in Europe. These Nigerian scams can be from any country, other than Nigeria. Be safe and delete these messages or report them.

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Comments (3)

Thank you for the warning information.

These people will never quit. LOL Thanks for the information!

Thank you for the alert to this important issue. Well done. Promoted.

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